5 Impactful Leadership Activities to Try at Work

A good leader is what makes any good business, any efficient group, or collaborative work successful. Their presence seems to make things run smoothly. When they encounter a problem, they’re right there and ready to fix the problem. A natural-born leader can be hard to find. However, people can quickly learn to associate success with good habits that help with the growth of their company.

The most successful companies started with a good foundation – working under the watchful eye of an exceptional leader. They care more than just making a profit. They care about the values and morals of the company as well. Here are a few of the essential elements of an effective leader:


1. They are responsible

This one seems pretty obvious, but sometimes the most obvious answers are the ones we overlook. A true leader is not just responsible for themselves but their entire team. Being responsible includes getting the job done promptly and being up to date with everything that affects the well-being of the company. It is also about finding the best solution to problems without having to sacrifice too much on their plate.

2. They communicate and listen well

Communication is key to a strong leader. They know the best ways to share things with different people, by paying attention to how their different teammates may learn and interact. Knowing how to communicate both in speech and in writing is also an essential skill to strong leadership. Having well-rounded vocabulary or being able to word things in ways people will understand gets instructions out and work done.

3. They are transparent and honest

People appreciate authenticity and honesty. Although it may not be the greatest thing to hear, the truth needs to come out or risk hurting more people later. An honest person will be trusted by employees and customers alike, for they believe that their leader will have their best interests in mind.

4. They are human

Having empathy is just as crucial as sympathy. Knowing how others can feel helps you understand how your employees and audience think. A good leader knows the appropriate time to act on their emotions, thoughts, or behaviours. Knowing how other people think can help with organizing people with similar strengths or people who best complement each other’s strengths and weaknesses. Being human is not always a weakness; knowing how to be caring and understanding towards others is essential to maintaining healthy working relationships in the workplace.

5. They are creative thinkers and like to solve problems

People are often envious of others creativity or proactive skills. Being able to innovate and improve certain aspects or areas of the company or the product will keep consumers engaged, interested, and intrigued by your company. Knowing how to problem solve and work around issues will get a team far with learning how to improvise instead of wasting time with deciding on a solution.

6. They devote themselves 100% to the vision of the company

Having a clear and distinct vision for the company or team is something a good leader will always bring to the table. Bring people together with a common goal can be an excellent way to get your teammates motivated to achieve milestones collectively. The more persistent the leader, the higher the chance that others will follow.


So now that we’ve defined the characteristics of a good leader, how can we get people to step up to this somewhat daunting position? With these leadership activities, the workplace will become more motivated, confident, and efficient. It takes a leader to get things organized, but a capable team will get the job done faster and more creatively with more minds working together.

Holding a good team-building activity every once in awhile improves confidence, trust, and communication between the group members. Here are 5 team building activities will take teamwork to a whole new level:


1. Survival of the Fittest

Presenting people with authentic life or death situations and certain limitations gets mind whirling with the prospects of what will be most effective for survival. Come up with several different events that will put people’s priorities to the test. Have them create a list of 15 items, and then hit them with the challenge of reducing that number to the 5 top essential items that will give them the best chance of surviving the longest.

Going around and sharing why certain items made or did not make the cut will increase critical thinking, problem-solving, future planning, and opportunity for creativity.

2. Shark Tank

Like the classic show with entrepreneurs and bloodthirsty sharks ready to tear apart their less than successful business plans, this game gets people working on the steps to turn a single idea into a successful business company. This game can be done individually or in small groups to think of the most effective sales pitch with a brand name, sales pitch, marketing plan, financial predictions, or future problems.

This game encourages creativity in the workplace and getting people to think business smarter. To get inspired, you could even pull up a few episodes of Shark Tank to get employees into character.

3. Manoeuvre the Minefield

If you’re in a crowded area, this might make the gameplay just a little more exciting. Create an obstacle course or “minefield” in an open area of the workspace. Choosing one person to be blindfolded and having another worker navigate them through the chaotic mess builds a strong sense of trust and partnership.

4. Stand Up

Take partnership to a whole new level with this game. Split your employees into pairs, and have them sit on the floor with their backs to each other and arms linked. Not only is this a classic game to play at parties, but getting coworkers who don’t always get along to collaborate might not be the worst idea after all.

5. Two Truths and a Lie

Getting coworkers to get along can sometimes be a struggle. Two truths and a lie can be a fun and engaging game that gets some people gasping in disbelief, or spilling their guts out with laughter.

Figuring out what the lie is can get people to open up or find common ground in ways they never thought possible. You might even be surprised by how much or how little you know about your employees.

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